youth advocacy

Vaporized: E-Cigarettes, Advertising, and Youth

Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 10.36.45 AMScreen Shot 2014-05-01 at 10.43.02 AMToday the Legacy for Health Foundation released their report Vaporized: E-Cigarettes, Advertising, and Youth, about the current trends of e-cigarette use amongst youth and the deeming regulations that were recently released by the FDA. The deeming document will set the national minimum age of 18 for the purchase of e-cigarettes. However, “it is essential that the regulation also prohibits marketing of these products to youth, something not included in the
proposal.”  According to the Center for Disease Control, the use of e-cigarettes doubled from 2011 to 2012 among middle and high school students and adults (18-34). As well, spending on advertising has risen from $5.6 million in 2010 to $82.1 million in 2013. “Overall, e-cigarette advertisers spent $39 million from June through November 2013, with magazines and national TV accounting for more than three-quarters of dollars spent.” Now that the Big Tobacco industries have taken over several big brands in the e-cigarette industry and are proposing to release their own e-cigarette brands later this year, it is expected that the amount of advertising will increase. E-cigarettes are proving to be a huge,
new, issue that is increasing the tobacco use rate amongst youth.

What are the issues that you see with e-cigarette use in your community and school

Bloopers of My Life

So this post is going to be a little bit out of the usual. I have been making videos recently for different projects and I decided to make a bloopers video out of some of the best moments I have had recently on camera. This is proof that activism can be fun! I hope you enjoy this as much as I do. 🙂 I believe that whenever anyone is making a video, for anything, they should make a bloopers real to show the behind the scenes of what is really happening between those “serious” shots. Videography can be fun and very time consuming so these awesome moments are the ones that keep people filming themselves and they deserve to be shared!

#BeTheVoice

Screen Shot 2014-04-28 at 12.03.38 PMFrom March 21 to March 23 I had the opportunity to go to Nevada to work with the youth of their state initiative at their state conference. I attended this conference with Ritney Castine from the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids; we were invited to participate at the conference as guest presenters. We taught the youth at the conference how to be leaders in their schools and communities and how to get their peers engaged in tobacco prevention. I really enjoyed how this conference was set up because during the day there were activities and presentations then in the afternoon and evening we all went to the park and the movies. *We watched Divergent, It was a really great movie and I would recommend it.*

I worked with the youth on social media engagement and I showed them how to create social media campaigns. I was really surprised to learn that most of Nevada does not have access to the internet so the youth there are not very engaged online. This was an obstacle for me as I planned my presentation. So, I improvised by showing them how to use what they could and I worked with their sponsors to set up blogs that their youth can write up posts for and then have their sponsors post for them. I, afterlighthonestly, assumed that everyone had access to the internet and that all young people were on social media. When I found out that most of Nevada’s youth do not even have access to the internet I was very surprised and it made me realize a lo of things about my plans for the future and how I plan on working in social change work.
Overall, I had a really great experience at this conference and I am very thankful that I had the opportunity to work with theseamazing young leaders. Nevada is a very beautiful state and I look forward to my next chance to visit. When I left they gave me a shirt that everyone had signed and a cup with a picture of the whole group. I really love doing this work and I am excited to see where it will take me in the future

Youth Engagement in Change: From the Summit on the 50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Tobacco Report

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50 years ago, US Surgeon General Luther L. Terry wrote the first Surgeon General’s report linking smoking to cancer.

Read Surgeon General Terry’s Report Here: http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/retrieve/Narrative/NN/p-nid/60

1069157_618847054837883_504654682_nIn honor of the historic 50 year milestone there was a summit held in New Orleans, Louisiana last week that was broadcasted live on the internet for people to view all around the world. The summit was a series of panel discussions featuring some of the leaders in the fight against big tobacco, including all living former US Surgeon Generals. I had the honor of being on the youth panel at the event that highlighted the importance of youth in promoting change in tobacco prevention initiatives and discussing the new FDA youth campaign The Real Cost that will soon be featured around the country and will directly target youth 12-17 and CVS’ decision to remove tobacco products from all of their stores. Overall the event was really amazing because of the people that were a part of it, but the best, and most rewarding, part was being able to tell the world that youth are the leaders of the change that we are seeing in society today.  

Whether or not the “adult world” wants to realize it, youth are the professionals in this generation. We have mastered the art of social media and we use it more than anyone else to spread our message and promote change that we support. If you want to successfully promote change then connect with a young person and give them the resources that they need to effectively use their voice in society. For a lot of adults that work in social change work this can be very scary because their job is on the line and they are trusting a young person. However, if adults would show young people that they trust them to do their work then they will do it with passion and the adult will find that giving a young person their voice in society is more rewarding than any amount of money. The truth is that young people listen to their peers in society more than they listen to adults. So why not recruit youth to lead change in society?

If you work in any form of activism then I would prompt you to include youth in all of your efforts and teach them how to do use their voice to promote change and lead the change. Also, please take some time to watch the summit (it is an entire days event so watching all of it at once is rather unreasonable but each panel is 30 minutes – 1 hour long and I have mentioned them below, in order, with a brief summary of the discussion topics) and pass it along to your colleagues.

There were six other panels at the event and they were all very informative about the current state of tobacco control. The entire summit is still online and can be viewed at: http://tobaccosummit.com/live.html

First panel: Conversations with U.S. Surgeons General – Reviewing the impact of the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, reflecting on efforts of Surgeons Generals since the groundbreaking report and discussing where do we go from here to have a tobacco-free generations.
Second panel: Next Tobacco-Free Generation – Young anti-tobacco leaders have a conversation about what they are doing to reach a tobacco-free generation with examples of campaigns that work and new public service announcements directed to young people.
Third panel: Sons of Our Father – The sons of Dr. Luther Terry an Dr. Alton Ochsner, two pioneers against smoking and the hazards of tobacco use, reflect on the life and legacy of their fathers.
Fourth panel: Litigation, Legislation or Regulation – What impact on public health has litigation, legislation and regulations had and will have.
Fifth panel: Media and the Tobacco-Free Generation – A discussion on media’s role and its influence on young people in the past, present and future.
Sixth panel: Marketing and New Products – Defy students from Lake Charles, Louisiana, will perform a skit centered around how tobacco is marketed to youth and what they plan to do about it.
Seventh panel: What’s Working – An overview of efforts that have succeeded in increasing awareness about tobacco’s harm to individual health and why prevention works.

Not Another 50

Not Another 50

So for my first post I have decided to do it over the most recent achievement in the world of tobacco prevention and the last event that I have worked on.

Last summer I went to Washington D.C. to work with The Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids and Legacy for Health Foundation on an activism event in front of the white house that highlighted the last 50 years since the first Surgeon Generals Report on tobacco use. We talked to people about how the first report linked smoking to cancer and how tobacco prevention has evolved over the last 50 years.

On the website you can see when an event, related to tobacco prevention, happened on a timeline and understand more about what the industry has done to evolve as well from all of the changes over the years. The website also has a link to how someone can get involved if they want to share this campaign.